Home Arts & Entertainment Cuesta College celebrates Dia de los Muertos

Cuesta College celebrates Dia de los Muertos

63
0
Poster board of Dia de los Muertos Altar. Photo by Hernandez Garcia - “The altars were made by two of Lopez’s Chicana and Chicano studies class,” said Sandy Hernandez, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30054814

The following is a list of Dia de los Muertos events/activities at Cuesta College:

Cultural Appropriation Discussion

October 30, 10:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.

Room N3102, North County Campus

Available via polycom on the SLO campus

Room 5401

Join Dee Limon for a discussion about how to be respectful when celebrating the Day of the Dead.

Dia de los Muertos Celebration

October 30, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Room 5401, San Luis Obispo Campus

Watch Coco, eat yummy food and decorate sugar skulls.

Dia de los Muertos Celebration

October 30, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Room N3102, North County Campus

Watch Coco, eat yummy food and decorate sugar skulls.

Visit the altar in the Student Success Center

Check out our Day of the Dead altar in the lobby of the Student Success Center on the main campus from October 28 to November 1.

If interested in helping with the altar contact Ali Phelps at cultural_center@cuesta.edu

About

El dia de los Muertos, the day of the dead, is a Mexican cultural event that celebrates the dead, most formally any family members that have passed away. Celebrated on November 1 and 2, the first day is to celebrate infants; this day is also known as Día de Todos los Santos.The following day is to celebrate the adults.

The celebration can take place anywhere from a home to a community parade. Families celebrate at their own home by making an ofrenda, an offering, filled with flowers, pan de muerto, candles, photographs and things that the deceased family member loved. It is said that on October 31 the deceased family members come to the ofrenda and celebrate.

In big places like Mexico City a parade is held, where people dress up for the occasion with traditional Mexican clothing and face paint of a sugar candy skull. The activities may vary, but some of the most common ones include performances such as singing and dancing.

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here